2016 – Senior Capstone, DEVIL’S LAKE STATE PARK: Gateway Interpretive Center, Baraboo, WI

2016-Capstone-Kotnik Sarah - Title page

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To fulfill the requirements of the Senior Capstone Program in the Department of Landscape Architecture I investigated how the ideas of environmental education may inform the design of a state park interpretive center.

Founded in 1911, Devil’s Lake State Park is the largest and most visited park in the Wisconsin State Park System. It has a rich cultural history along with unique geologic and natural resources that make it a popular destination for education and recreation in south central Wisconsin. The current nature center at Devil’s Lake has inadequate space and amenities for best serving its many visitors. This project will seek out oppotunities for broadening the scope of existing programs and for making environmental education more accessible and interactive. The proposed interpretive center will emphasize Ice Age interpretation while providing visitors with high quality recreational experiences and preserving the unique cultural, geologic, and natural features of the park.

Sarah Kotnik

BS in Landscape Architecture 2016

Contour 2014-2015 Vol. IV

Contour Vol 04 2015

Contour 2014-2015 PDF

I am excited to present the 2014-2015 Contour, a catalog of graduating senior capstone projects. This is our fourth annual catalog profiling student work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This year’s catalog spans a diverse set of projects: landscape preservation, integrated agricultural systems, downtown redevelopment, urban waterfronts and parks and therapeutic landscapes. Geographically they range from Superior to Sturgeon Bay in the north to Boscobel and Oconomowoc in the south. Students continue to take the Wisconsin Idea to all regions of the state interacting with state residents and gaining experience in the practice of landscape architecture in preparation for entering the professional job market or continuing to graduate school.

The two-semester capstone provides students the opportunity to demonstrate their skills, knowledge and ability to resolve “real-world” design problems. Passing capstone is a requirement for graduation. Since the 1980s, the Department’s capstone projects have addressed the needs of more than 250 clients. Applications from communities and public agencies seeking to become a part of the capstone experience continue to grow in numbers to where we now have a waiting list.

Please share your comments with the Department. If you know of a project appropriate to the capstone experience, contact Eric Schuchardt or me; we are constantly looking for the best in complex and engaging projects for students to undertake.

John Harrington, Chair

Department of Landscape Architecture

Fall 2015

2015 – Senior Capstone, Wingra Creek Master Plan, Madison, WI

Before and After

2015-UWMadisonLandArch-Capstone-MadisonWI-byPeterClark

To fulfill the requirements of the Senior Capstone Program in the Department of Landscape Architecture I investigated how the economic value of green space may inform the design of a riverfront revitalization.

The Wingra Creek is a two mile long urban waterway located in the southern portion of the Madison and runs from Lake Wingra to Lake Monona. The proposed capstone vision for the Wingra Creek seeks to build off of this previous Wingra Creek Plan set forth by the City of Madison and explore how creek revitalization strategies, along with programming and outreach, can turn the creek and the creek banks into a prominent public parkway for the south Madison communities.

Peter Clark

BS in Landscape Architecture 2015

2015 – Senior Capstone, Rethinking Our Food Systems: Envisioning a Barge Delivery Food Hub, Milwaukee, WI

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2015-UWMadisonLandArch-Capstone-MilwaukeeWI-byJuliaSchilling

This project investigates the design of a barge delivery food hub located at the Port of Milwaukee. Situated on Lake Michigan at the northernmost port of the Mississippi river system, intersecting three major rivers, with two on-site rail lines and within a half mile of two major highways, the derelict Solvay Coke and Gas site is the ideal testing ground for exploring the potential of a multi-modal food distribution network. Food system transparency, food accessibility, public waterfront access, and brownfield remediation are integral components of this proposal. The design strategies and research for this site in the City of Milwaukee will be used to communicate the greater regional and community impacts of creating a decentralized food distribution system in alliance with the Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems and an interdisciplinary team of stakeholders invested in rethinking the future of our food systems.

Julia Schilling

BS in Landscape Architecture 2015

Contour 2012-2013 Vol. II

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Contour 2012-2013 PDF

Welcome to Contour, our second annual catalog of senior capstone projects, and the University of Wiscon-sin-Madison’s Department of Landscape Architecture profile of student work. This issue focuses on a select group of capstone projects completed during the 2012-2013 school year.

The two-semester capstone provides students the op-portunity to demonstrate their skills, knowledge and ability to resolve a “real-world” design problem. All stu-dents in the accredited undergraduate program are required to pass the capstone in order to graduate.

Most projects fall within community design, urban re-development, conservation, or regional design. Since the 1980s, our capstone projects have addressed the needs of more than 225 client organizations, the ma-jority of these being Wisconsin communities represent-ing more than 55 counties. In addition, past capstone projects have occurred in Minnesota, Texas, New York and Illinois.

Please enjoy this issue of Contour and we encourage you to share your comments with the Department.  We are always looking for complex and engaging projects for students to undertake.

John Harrington, Chair
Department of Landscape Architecture

Fall 2013

Contour 2013-2014 Vol. III

Contour 2013-214 Vol. III

Contour 2013-2014 PDF

This issue of Contour focuses on a select group of 14 capstone projects completed during the 2013-2014 school year.

The two-semester capstone provides students the opportunity to demonstrate their skills, knowledge and ability to resolve a “real-world” design problem while working with clients across Wisconsin. All students in the accredited undergraduate program are required to pass the capstone in order to graduate.

The projects selected for this year’s Contour include visions for waterfronts, parks, community development and revitalization, and ecological corridors. Since the 1980s, the Department’s capstone projects have addressed the needs of more than 240 client organizations, the majority of these being Wisconsin communities representing more than 55 counties.

As you enjoy this issue of Contour, I encourage you to share your comments with the Department. If you know of a project appropriate to the capstone, contact Eric or me, we are always looking for complex and engaging projects for students to undertake.

John Harrington, Chair

Department of Landscape Architecture

Fall 2014

 

2014 – Senior Capstone, 30th Street Industrial Corridor, Milwaukee, WI

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2014-UWMadisonLandArch-Capstone-MilwaukeeWI-byJakeWievel

My capstone proposal is ultimately concerned with creating an effective approach to community revitalization in the 30th street industrial corridor in Milwaukee, WI, which is respectful of existing community and cultural assets, as well as the environment. This will be achieved by analyzing the cross linkages which exist between improved environmental conditions, economy, and community vitality. Through the integration of green infrastructure, this project seeks to define a successful approach to flood mitigation, job creation, and the improvement of environmental health, all integral in creating an environmental justice movement and improving social equity within the city of Milwaukee.

Jake Wievel

BSLA 2014

2014 – Senior Capstone, Langdon and Mansion Hill Waterfront Development, Madison, WI

2014-UW_LandArch_Capstone-ZachSmall-MadisonWI.pdf

2014-UWMadisonLandArch-Capstone-MadisonWI-byZachSmall

This project examines the Mansion Hill and Langdon Districts of Madison, Wisconsin, with the intention of creating public open space infrastructure along Lake Mendota. Site history and inventory will inform a regional, community and site scale analysis which will provide a basis for a design proposal. The project will explore historic preservation issues, ultimately attempting to balance historic preservation with development pressures in the neighborhood while providing public infrastructure to complement the character of the district. The City of Madison Planning Department, the Madison Trust for Historic Preservation, Our Historic Campus and 1000 Friends of Wisconsin will serve as my client.

Zach Small

BSLA 2014

 

2014 – Senior Capstone, Garver Park, Madison, WI

2014-UW_LandArch_Capstone-ParkerJones-MadisonWI.pdf

2014-UWMadisonLandArch-Capstone-MadisonWI-byParkerJones

The derelict Garver Feed Mill on Madison’s east side offers a unique connection to the city’s industrial history, while the surrounding property remains the largest unprogrammed public open space within city limits. Bordered on two sides by Starkweather Creek – a polluted urban stream – the site holds opportunities for ecological restoration, historic and cultural education, and the overall creation of a community park.

Through the study and synthesis of landscape history and wetland reconstruction, the gathering of community input, stakeholder meetings, and review of existing precedents, this proposal provides an analytical framework for the development of the Garver Feed Mill & North Plat. Only by understanding the site’s historic and cultural contexts, and through creating a participatory, recreational environment, can Garver become a valuable destination at both local and regional scales, providing a new type of amenity to the City of Madison.

Parker Jones

BSLA 2014